nothingbutflawless:

If you want to be skinny, that’s fine. If you want to be curvy that’s fine. If you want to be tall, that’s fine. If you want to be short, that’s fine. But don’t start insulting different body shapes and sizes just because it isn’t want you would want for yourself.

(via missspookynoodles)

overly-khr-obsessed:

naililyam:

kessuburd:

huffingtonpost:

My Beautiful Woman based on a true story. 

Think twice before you judge a parent. 

most watch.

Guys, please watch this. This has to be one of the most powerful videos in the world, I bawled my eyes out

(Source: youtube.com, via pearlofbitterness)

cosplaytutorial:

Tip Tuesday #80

Use a bit of paint to colour in shadows and accent highlights on your costume. That way you have some control over the appearance of your costume in photos. This can also help you stand out while walking around!

(via reapergrellsutcliff)

dottoraqn:

abundantchewtoys:

blaperile:

homestuckfluffcanons:

“To a human, shipping one’s friends would be creepy and invasive. Since the trolls need to have partners by adulthood or be culled, Nepeta’s shipping is actually a public service; she’s trying to ensure they will be safe.”
chelonianmobile suggested

Oh man, I hadn’t thought about it like that before.

Oooh, now that sheds a whole new light on that habit.

That is so cute and morbid at the same time.

dottoraqn:

abundantchewtoys:

blaperile:

homestuckfluffcanons:

To a human, shipping one’s friends would be creepy and invasive. Since the trolls need to have partners by adulthood or be culled, Nepeta’s shipping is actually a public service; she’s trying to ensure they will be safe.”

chelonianmobile suggested

Oh man, I hadn’t thought about it like that before.

Oooh, now that sheds a whole new light on that habit.

That is so cute and morbid at the same time.

(via erikisafail)

Kirishima Touka | Episode 6

(Source: ayyatos, via sanjl)

"Do not look for a sanctuary in anyone except your self."

Buddha (via thecalminside)

(via aneko1216)

oeilvert:

que no pare la fiesta

oeilvert:

que no pare la fiesta

(via aneko1216)

Patrick Wilson 4 the love of gawd don’t ever turn around

(Source: canadaloveselena, via akabakaotaku)

(Source: gusfrngs, via aneko1216)

The Dummies' Guide To Cosplay Photography in 2014

bellechere:

The Dummies’ Guide To Cosplay Photography

The majority of the cosplayer photos I take are posed. If you’ve never taken cosplay photos at a con before, it’s easy-peasy. Here’s the procedure I follow:

  1. Make sure your camera or phone is turned on, set the way you want it, and ready to shoot before you approach the cosplayer. Fiddle with settings during your time, not theirs.
  2. Approach the cosplayer if he or she doesn’t seem otherwise busy.
  3. Make eye contact and ask “May I take your picture?” in a friendly way. Bonus points for addressing them by their character name (signifying that you recognize the costume) and for offering a sincere compliment on something you particularly like about the costume.
  4. Allow the cosplayer to take a moment to make any adjustments he or she deems necessary. They’ll probably want to put down the Diet Coke, move their con badge out of sight, and pick up the prop they worked so hard on. More importantly, they’ll probably want to make sure that parts of their costume haven’t come apart, or shifted in a way that will cause embarrassment. And they’ll want to settle into a pose that they like.
  5. When the cosplayer is ready, give them a 3-2-1 countdown, so that they know exactly how long they’re going to need to hold that pose or expression. Click.
  6. Say “Got it,” so that they know the shooting is over and that they can now relax. Or just, you know, blink.
  7. Resume eye contact, smile, and thank the cosplayer for their time.

Supplemental notes:

  • It’s perfectly fine to ask the cosplayer to move to another location (close by), if it won’t cause an inconvenience. A bare, light-colored wall nearby served as a much better background for Joker and Harley than the dark crowd-filled distracting mess of the convention aisle where I first spotted them. But: consider the possible inconvenience to the cosplayer.
  • In fact, asking a cosplayer to move a nearby spot away from the main flow of con traffic is often just good courtesy. It avoids creating a bottleneck in the aisle. Your photo only took five seconds, but then a crowd gathered and the resulting traffic jam caused Gil Gerard to be late for his Buck Rogers spotlight panel.
  • It’s also usually fine to ask (nicely) for a specific pose, so long as you’ve already visualized it and you can give them clear and quick direction. Try to make your intentions crystal-clear (“There’s this big overhead light behind you…I’d like to line it up behind your left hand so that it looks like you’re projecting energy”) so that they can make an informed decision about whether or not they’d like to pose that way. Plus, if they know what you have in mind, they can actively help you get the shot you want.
  • It’s also OK to take more than one shot. If I’m unsure about the lighting, I’ll try to get one with fill-flash and one without. But I put up a mental five-second shot clock: that’s the maximum amount of the cosplayer’s time I’d like to consume. This underscores the need to have my camera and my creative eye set before I approach. If I screw something up and I don’t get the shot, hey, too bad for me.
  • As always, consider the convenience and patience of the cosplayer. They like to show off their costume and they’re generally happy to pose. To make a costume and then keep it in a closet is like writing a play and never allowing it to be staged. But never forget that they’re posing for you as an act of kindness. Don’t take up too much of their time, or otherwise treat them like they’re working for you. That’s flat-out terrible. They shouldn’t even have to stand and wait for you to unlock your phone and launch the Camera app and wait for it to boot up and then for you to turn off the Panorama settings and then…etc. Even if I know I’ve blown the shot and I need ten more seconds to fix my camera, I’ll usually just thank the cosplayer and send him or her on their way to enjoy the rest of the con. Again: the cosplayer is being kind. They don’t work for me.

This is a short version of the procedures and guidelines I’ve developed over several years of shooting comic-cons.

But none of these items are nearly as important as the one simple rule that I never, ever knowingly break:

You must never do anything that makes the cosplayer wish you hadn’t taken that photo.

This is a fantastic article written by photo-journalist Andy Ihnatko. I’ve taken the liberty of quoting his general rules of conduct, which I believe a lot of people could learn from, but the entire article is well-worth the read. 

In the article Andy explores the evolution of how conventions are handling cosplayer and photographer relationships and safety guidelines. He makes some incredibly valid points, all well-worded, and raises some interesting questions.

Boston Comic Con had an anti-harassment policy in place that I’m sure played a part in my having a harassment-free weekend. For that, I am grateful. Does their policy hinder photographers like Andy from moment-capturing, paparazzi-like photo-journalism? It does. Part of me believes that to be a shame. However, part of me is glad for it, because I think all cosplayers can agree that very, very few un-posed photos are flattering (especially when we’re eating/drinking!), and no one really appreciates unflattering photos being posted online.

What do you think?

(via foodandcosplay)

Every time someone almost called Edward short

(via dancedancereivolution)

(Source: buffyannesummers, via onlylolgifs)

sarahwalker:

favourite character meme 
three relationships willow rosenberg 

(via boredn0w)

amy30535:

Princess series - Celestia by amy30535

amy30535:

Princess series - Celestia by amy30535

(via girlsbydaylight)

reapergrellsutcliff:

♥
((Art by Tenebres.))

reapergrellsutcliff:

((Art by Tenebres.))

(via reapergrellsutcliff)